Teacher leaves Colac to help NT youths

Colac’s Mick McCrickard is leaving Trinity College Colac after 16 years to work in an indigenous community in the Northern Territory.

Colac’s Mick McCrickard is leaving Trinity College Colac after 16 years to work in an indigenous community in the Northern Territory.

A COLAC teacher is moving to the Northern Territory to help indigenous youths, ending 16 years of work at a Colac school.

Trinity College wellbeing co-ordinator Mick McCrickard will next month head to an indigenous community at Daly River, which is a three-hour car trip south-east of Darwin, to take up a job supporting Aboriginal youths.

“It is something I have always wanted to do, it is a really good opportunity,” Mr McCrickard said.

“I’ll be trying to re-engage 18 to 21-year-old indigenous kids back into the community, trying to find them some sort of pathway,” he said.

“A lot of kids have gone to Darwin and they have probably got into drugs, then they come back to Daly River with addictions.

“It fits in with the welfare and wellbeing I already do,” he said.

Mr McCrickard said he and his wife Anne planned to stay in the Northern Territory for “a couple of years”.

“My wife will come up in six months or so and work with kids who have learning problems,” he said.

“I might only last two weeks but the plan is to put in a fair bit of time there.”

Mr McCrickard said he expected challenges to include working with young people who only spoke tribal languages, the heat and the isolation.

“Because I am a bit of a people person, I’ll be missing people down here, although my kids are going to come and go quite a bit,” he said.

“They are the challenges I hope to deal with.”

Mr McCrickard said he had “loved” his time at Trinity College and was grateful for the relationships he had built over the past 16 years.

“I really enjoyed being at Trinity and the support from the kids, the parents and the wider community, it has been brilliant,” he said.

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